SAVE THE DATE: LARVAE EXPECTED

This guest blog post is from four of our amazing undergraduate (or just-graduated!) Frank Lab Summer Employees: Nicole Bissonette (Zoology ‘15), Laura Daly (Horticulture ‘14), Karly Dugan (Animal Science ‘15) and Danielle Schmidt (Zoology ‘15). This blog is proof that even non-entomology majors can fall madly in love with bugs.

The expectant MOTHers in the Frank Lab.

The expectant MOTHers in the Frank Lab.

Once upon a lunch break, the four of us discovered a moth frantically flapping its wings beneath a

Rescued imperial moth

Rescued imperial moth

Southern Magnolia, unable to fly. We were concerned as she struggled to crawl up the tree and decided to bring her back to the Frank lab. Since our fellow coworkers were out in the field conducting research, we had to put on our entomology caps. After some intense googling, we discovered our lovely, large friend was an Imperial Moth.

 Going off our immensely extravagant base of insect knowledge (#sarcasm, #non-entomology majors), our observations lead us to believe that she was pregnant, not relieving herself as we had originally thought. Once brought into the lab, we noticed she stopped laying eggs, since she was probably getting cold due to the air conditioning. So, we relocated her to the balcony outside in the sun. Once warm, her ovipositor picked up speed, and was dropping eggs like ‘dey were hawt.’ We

Imperial moth eggs.

Imperial moth eggs.

decided to let her lay eggs all night in this plastic container as per suggestions on several other blogs. When we came into the lab the next morning, she had laid over 50 eggs! We have decided we are going to raise them as our own and document our experience. Save the date, cross your fingers, and check back for updates on our “MOTHerhood” duties!